WUGA-MP3

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WUGA-MP3

Public radio for Athens and Northeast Georgia with NPR and local news
http://wuga.org
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  • James Michael Tyler, who played Gunther on 'Friends,' dies at 59

    wuga.org Monday, 25 October 2021 07:07:00

    James Michael Tyler, the actor best known for playing the recurring character Gunther on Friends , has died at age 59 of prostate cancer. He died at his home in Los Angeles on Sunday morning, his manager Toni Benson confirmed to NPR. "The world knew him as Gunther (the seventh "Friend")," Benson said in a statement, "but Michael's loved ones knew him as an actor, musician, cancer-awareness advocate, and loving husband. Michael loved live music, cheering on his Clemson Tigers, and would often find himself in fun and unplanned adventures. If you met him once you made a friend for life." Tyler was first cast on the hit show as a background actor but went on to become the recurring character with the most appearances: Gunther, a shy and eccentric barista who took a lot of punches from the main characters and had an unrequited love for Rachel (Jennifer Aniston). The character had "a good soul, a good heart deep down, for everyone except Ross [David Schwimmer]," Tyler said in 2019 . Tyler

  • Powerful storm brings heavy rain, flooding and mud flows to Northern California

    wuga.org Monday, 25 October 2021 04:19:00

    Updated October 24, 2021 at 7:13 PM ET SAN FRANCISCO — A powerful storm barreled toward Southern California after flooding highways, toppling trees and causing mud flows in areas burned bare by recent fires across the northern part of the state. Drenching showers and strong winds accompanied the weekend's arrival of an atmospheric river — a long and wide plume of moisture pulled in from the Pacific Ocean. The National Weather Service's Sacramento office warned of "potentially historic rain." Flooding was reported across the San Francisco Bay Area, closing streets in Berkeley, inundating Oakland's Bay Bridge toll plaza and overflowing rivers in Napa and Sonoma counties. Power poles were downed and tens of thousands of people in the North Bay were without electricity. By Sunday morning, Mount Tamalpais just north of San Francisco had recorded a half foot of rainfall during the previous 12 hours, the weather service said. "Some of our higher elevation locations could see 6, 7, 8 inches of

  • Movie Review: 'The Harder They Fall'

    wuga.org Monday, 25 October 2021 03:08:00

    DAVID FOLKENFLIK, HOST: Finally today, we're going to talk about apple picking. Lots of people do it each fall, and they enjoy it. Or so it seems when you ask them about it. We picked some apple pickers at an orchard in Red Hook, N.Y., to tell us about their experience. (SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE) UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: It's probably my favorite fall tradition. It's also, like, more meaningful and more delicious and more fun if you pick it yourself, for some reason. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: More fresh, and it's about the experience and everything. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: It still, like, fascinates me to look at an apple. And, like, it's still this kind of little miracle to me. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #4: For me, it's like a memory. I've been doing this since I was a kid. I remember doing it every year. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #5: And what's a better Saturday activity for tons of mostly city kids than going apple picking if you're in the country? Would you guys say it's been a very pleasant

  • Encore: Havana Syndrome remains a mystery as researchers study microwave beam theory

    wuga.org Monday, 25 October 2021 03:08:00

    DAVID FOLKENFLIK, HOST: The U.S. government wants to know why some U.S. diplomats and intelligence officers are getting sick. It's called Havana syndrome, after the illnesses turned up in Havana. Many say they've suffered debilitating migraines, dizziness and memory loss. Some history may be relevant. Years before the first Havana cases were reported, the U.S. government documented microwave radiation being directed at a U.S. embassy and at officials abroad. NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre has the backstory. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST) GREG MYRE: In 1996, Mike Beck and a colleague at the National Security Agency were sent to a hostile country on a brief assignment. He knew he was being watched. And he woke up one morning feeling terrible. MIKE BECK: It was extreme fatigue and weakness. I was a bowl of jelly. I couldn't get moving. MYRE: He was suspicious. But the symptoms went away. A decade later, Beck was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson's disease at age

  • The problem with apple-picking

    wuga.org Monday, 25 October 2021 03:08:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit DAVID FOLKENFLIK, HOST: Finally today, we're going to talk about apple picking. Lots of people do it each fall, and they enjoy it. Or so it seems when you ask them about it. We picked some apple pickers at an orchard in Red Hook, N.Y., to tell us about their experience. (SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE) UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: It's probably my favorite fall tradition. It's also, like, more meaningful and more delicious and more fun if you pick it yourself, for some reason. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: More fresh, and it's about the experience and everything. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: It still, like, fascinates me to look at an apple. And, like, it's still this kind of little miracle to me. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #4: For me, it's like a memory. I've been doing this since I was a kid. I remember doing it every year. UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #5: And what's a better Saturday activity for tons of mostly city kids than going apple picking if you're in the country? Would you guys

  • Jay Black, lead singer of pop group The Americans, dies at 82

    wuga.org Monday, 25 October 2021 02:33:00

    Jay Black, lead singer for the 1960s pop group Jay and the Americans, has died at the age of 82. The band announced the singer's death in a statement posted to Facebook on Saturday. "Today, we mourn the passing of David Blatt a/k/a Jay Black and we acknowledge the great successes we had with him both as a partner and as a lead singer," the band wrote. "We shared both wonderful and very contentious times, and much like an ex-wife, we are so proud of the beautiful children we created. We'll always remember The Voice." Bandmate and the Americans vocalist Sandy Deanne told The Associated Press that Black, born David Blatt, died on Friday due to complications from pneumonia. Black was commonly known in the 1960s as "The Voice" for his crooning, doo wop-inspired vocals. He was the second singer for Jay and the Americans, replacing Jay Traynor, changing his stage name to Jay to match the group. His last name, Blatt, was changed to Black by mistake. "I was on the Mike Douglas show," he told

  • The fatal shooting of Halyna Hutchins is prompting calls to ban real guns from sets

    wuga.org Monday, 25 October 2021 01:01:00

    Mourners gathered at a vigil on Saturday to remember cinematographer Halyna Hutchins, who was killed in an accidental shooting on the set of the film Rust last week. Alec Baldwin was given a prop gun which he was told was safe before firing it, killing Hutchins, 42, and wounding director Joel Souza. Baldwin is cooperating with investigators. Souza, who has since been released from the hospital, told NBC that his thoughts were with Hutchins' family. "She was kind, vibrant, incredibly talented, fought for every inch and always pushed me to be better," Souza said, according to the statement. Hutchins' husband, Matt, tweeted that the loss was "enormous," adding that "Halyna inspired us all with her passion and vision, and her legacy is too meaningful to encapsulate in words." The accidental shooting was not the first gun death on a film or TV set, but it has refocused attention on how firearms can be used safely by the entertainment industry — and also raised the question of whether they

  • White House delays the release of secret JFK assassination records, citing COVID-19

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 23:36:00

    The White House has announced that a trove of remaining records concerning the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy will not be released as planned, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Congress declared in 1992 that all government records surrounding Kennedy's assassination "should be eventually disclosed to enable the public to become fully informed about the history surrounding the assassination." But a part of that law also says that the release of these records can be postponed if their public disclosure would cause "identifiable harm" to military, intelligence, law enforcement or foreign operations. The National Archives says it needs more time In a memo released Friday, the White House said the National Archives and Records Administration has concluded that, because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it requires additional time to consult with government agencies to determine how much more information about the 1963 assassination can be released. According to the memo, the

  • An Indiana town is wooing new residents with on-demand grandparents

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 20:08:00

    Updated October 24, 2021 at 3:27 PM ET Would you move to a small Indiana town for on-demand grandparents? That's part of the benefit of moving to Greensburg, Ind., a town that's offering incentives for new residents who move there, including $5,000 in cash, a YMCA membership, gift cards to the local farmers market and a service they're calling " Grandparents on Demand ." Greensburg is about 50 miles southeast of Indianapolis. It's a small community with a population of about 12,000. But the town is hoping to grow and one of the incentives it's offering is having grandparents on standby. Tami Wenning, the director of the Decatur County Community Foundation, and her husband Dan are the grandparents up-f0r-grabs in town. They've held local positions in town and hosted foreign exchange students in the past — and they are also grandparents themselves. Stepping in to be grandparents, or babysitters at times, to help out new residents would help ease the transition into moving to Greensburg,

  • Ahmaud Arbery muralist turns to Brunswick history

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 20:08:00

    BRUNSWICK, Ga. — The trial of three white men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery has put Brunswick back in the national spotlight. Arbery was the 25-year old Black man shot to death last year while jogging through a neighborhood. Artist Marvin Weeks memorialized Arbery in a mural that has become a focal point for racial justice advocates in this town on the Georgia coast. "I think that's very important," Weeks says. "A gathering place, you know, because my work really centers around neighborhoods." Last Sunday ahead of jury selection about 200 demonstrators chanted "Justice for Ahmaud!" beneath the two-story portrait of Arbery. Weeks painted it on the side of a building that's being re-developed as an African-American cultural center. Weeks says this is what he'd hoped to see happening around the artwork. "Because there's always a meeting place — a place to do the call and to talk about the issues that's going on," he says. "I think the mural does that." The mural is adapted from

  • Colombia has captured one of the world's most wanted drug lords, Dairo Antonio Úsuga

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 18:21:00

    BOGOTA, Colombia — Colombian security forces have captured the country's most wanted drug trafficker, a rural warlord who stayed on the run for more than a decade by corrupting state officials and aligning himself with combatants on the left and right. President Iván Duque likened the arrest Saturday of Dairo Antonio Úsuga to the capture three decades ago of Pablo Escobar. Colombia's military presented Úsuga to the media in handcuffs and wearing rubber boots preferred by rural farmers. Úsuga, better known by his alias Otoniel, is the alleged head of the much-feared Gulf Clan, whose army of assassins has terrorized much of northern Colombia to gain control of major cocaine smuggling routes through thick jungles north to Central America and onto the U.S. He's long been a fixture on the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's most-wanted fugitives list, for whose capture it had been offering a $5 million reward. He was first indicted in 2009, in Manhattan federal court, on narcotics

  • China is removing domes from mosques as part of a push to make them more 'Chinese'

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 17:02:00

    XINING, China — The Dongguan Mosque has adopted some very different looks in its nearly 700 years in China's northwestern city of Xining. Built in the style of a Chinese imperial palace, with tiled roofs and no domes, and adorned with Buddhist symbols, the mosque was nearly destroyed by neglect during political tumult in the early 20th century. In the 1990s, authorities replaced the original ceramic tiles on the roof and minarets with green domes. This year, provincial authorities lopped off those domes. "The government says they want us to 'sinify' our mosques, so they look more like Beijing's Tiananmen Square," says Ali, a Muslim farmer selling pomegranates outside the mosque. He requested that NPR use only his first name because residents have been ordered not to speak about the dome removals. "I think the mosque looks good either way, but what say do we have anyways?" China is removing the domes and minarets from thousands of mosques across the country. Authorities say the domes

  • The superstar teachers of our Student Podcast Challenge

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 17:00:00

    It's that time of year again! Power up your smartphones and build your pillow forts , because we're about to open NPR's Student Podcast Challenge. Every year, we hear amazing student voices from around the country, and air the best student podcast entries on Morning Edition , All Things Considered , Code Switch , and other NPR programs. The contest, which has drawn more than 40,000 students from around the country into audio storytelling, is back for it's fourth year: opening in December for college students and in January for grades 5-12. (For more information on the contest check out our website and subscribe to our newsletter .) In judging these entries now for three years running, we've noticed that the names of certain schools, and certain teachers, keep showing up regularly. There's Stilwell High School in Stilwell, Okla., and the students in Faith Phillips' class. And Zehra Lakhani's class from Clearwater Fundamental Middle School, in Clearwater, Fla., who consistently have top

  • Thousands of workers are opting to get fired, rather than take the vaccine

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 17:00:00

    For 33 years, Karl Bohnak worked at his dream job delivering weather forecasts on TV for what he considers one of the most challenging but beautiful spots in the United States — Michigan's Upper Peninsula. He became so popular that "That's what Karl says!" became a slogan at his station in the 1990s and even inspired a song. But Bohnak's time as chief meteorologist for news station TV6 came to an abrupt end last month. He was fired after refusing to comply with the vaccine mandate imposed by his station's corporate owner, Gray Television. "I just did not want to take the shot," says Bohnak, who is 68. "I felt it was my right as a human being and a citizen of the U.S. to decide what I put in my body." Across the country, employers are firing workers for refusing to comply with vaccine mandates. Some people are opting to quit their jobs rather than take the shot. These workers represent only a tiny fraction of overall employees, not even 1% in some workplaces. But it can add up to

  • Facebook dithered in curbing divisive user content in India

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 07:25:00

    NEW DELHI, India — Facebook in India has been selective in curbing hate speech, misinformation and inflammatory posts, particularly anti-Muslim content, according to leaked documents obtained by The Associated Press, even as its own employees cast doubt over the company's motivations and interests. From research as recent as March of this year to company memos that date back to 2019, the internal company documents on India highlight Facebook's constant struggles in quashing abusive content on its platforms in the world's biggest democracy and the company's largest growth market. Communal and religious tensions in India have a history of boiling over on social media and stoking violence. The files show that Facebook has been aware of the problems for years, raising questions over whether it has done enough to address these issues. Many critics and digital experts say it has failed to do so, especially in cases where members of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party

  • The tongue-eating louse does exactly what its name suggests

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 03:15:00

    It's the stuff of nightmares, or science fiction: a parasite that wants to get inside an animal's mouth, where it attacks — and replaces — the tongue. That's the incredibly specific, terribly icky job of the tongue-eating louse. Luckily for humans, the isopod doesn't affect people. But the Atlantic croaker and other fish are less fortunate, as a recent Facebook posting by the Galveston Island State Park in Texas shows. "This parasite detaches the fish's tongue, attaches itself to the fish's mouth, and becomes its tongue," the wildlife agency said, expounding on a photo showing the isopod curled inside a croaker's mouth. "The parasite then feeds on the fish's mucus. It also happens to be the only known case where a parasite functionally replaces a host's organ." Several commenters on the post said that for years now, they've seen the tongue-eating louse on fish in nearby Gulf of Mexico waters. Along with croaker, the parasite is commonly found in the mouths of sea trout and several

  • Life Kit: How to better manage your time

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 03:11:00

    DAVID FOLKENFLIK, HOST: And finally today, in the near future, residents of Seattle may well be startled as they notice a fleet of new cars cruising down the city streets. These are to be cars without drivers behind the wheel. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED NEWS ANCHOR: (Laughter) It looks like a - maybe like a bus from the front and a toaster on the side. FOLKENFLIK: That's a local news anchor commenting on Amazon's autonomous car unit, Zoox, which will soon start test driving downtown there. Zoox engineers say the city's wet, windy and congested streets are the ideal testing ground for what are being called robotaxis. Their aim is to one day deploy a fleet of driverless taxis. Advocates for these cars say they'll solve a ton of problems, like reducing collisions and carbon emissions. Critics are casting doubts about how safe these vehicles are and questioned the motives propelling the embrace of this technology by tech giants. Someone who has studied and written about

  • Former Netflix employee fired for alleged leak says Chappelle's special is dangerous

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 03:11:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit DAVID FOLKENFLIK, HOST: The streaming giant Netflix continues to face a backlash over comedian Dave Chappelle's latest standup special. The greatest heat centers on jokes about and aimed at the transgender community, and Netflix staffers are among Chappelle's most vocal critics. Several dozen employees staged a walkout this past Wednesday in protest over the company's defense of Chappelle and of the special. And one of the organizers of the walkout has been singled out for attention. That's B. Pagels-Minor (ph). Netflix recently fired them, alleging they leaked, quote, "confidential, commercially sensitive information," unquote, to people outside the company. They denied that. B. Pagels-Minor. formerly co-led the trans and nonbinary employee resource group at Netflix, and they join us now. Welcome. And thanks for joining us. B PAGELS-MINOR: Thank you for having me. FOLKENFLIK: B., you first took a position with Netflix a few years back. Tell me,

  • What does the future of driverless cars look like?

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 03:11:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit DAVID FOLKENFLIK, HOST: And finally today, in the near future, residents of Seattle may well be startled as they notice a fleet of new cars cruising down the city streets. These are to be cars without drivers behind the wheel. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED NEWS ANCHOR: (Laughter) It looks like a - maybe like a bus from the front and a toaster on the side. FOLKENFLIK: That's a local news anchor commenting on Amazon's autonomous car unit, Zoox, which will soon start test driving downtown there. Zoox engineers say the city's wet, windy and congested streets are the ideal testing ground for what are being called robotaxis. Their aim is to one day deploy a fleet of driverless taxis. Advocates for these cars say they'll solve a ton of problems, like reducing collisions and carbon emissions. Critics are casting doubts about how safe these vehicles are and questioned the motives propelling the embrace of this technology by tech giants.

  • 20 years ago, the iPod was born

    wuga.org Sunday, 24 October 2021 02:49:00

    It officially has been 20 years since Apple announced the upcoming release of one of its most iconic products: the iPod. The company unveiled the first version of its handheld music player to the world on Oct. 23, 2001 , and it went on sale the following month. With the slogan "1,000 songs in your pocket," the first-generation iPod was quick to capture the public's attention and was the companion to the newly unveiled iTunes, the digital music software that ushered in a new era of how people listen to music. Apple went on to sell more than 400 million iPods, according to The New York Times . When Steve Jobs rejoined Apple in 1997 after a 12-year absence, the company was on the verge of losing it all, but the iPod, which NPR described in 2009 as a "quantum leap in listening," was one of the products that turned things around. Though ubiquitous smartphones have largely replaced portable devices solely dedicated to music, Apple still sells one product under the iPod name: the iPod touch.

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