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  • Scotch Lamb Mac and Cheese

    foodiequine.co.uk | Sun, 23 Sep 2018 23:30:00 +0000

    Post in collaboration with Quality Meat Scotland


    Lamb Mac and Cheese is Scottish comfort food at its best and then some! Scotch Lamb PGI stirred through creamy macaroni cheese before being topped with lashings of Scottish cheddar and baked in the oven until ooey and gooey. The best bits of macaroni cheese and shepherd’s pie all rolled into one midweek meal which the whole family will enjoy. 



    Pastitsio is a Greek pasta bake made with spiced lamb mince, tomato sauce, bechamel sauce and layers of macaroni. As lovely as it sounds, I reckon the constituent ingredients could be made even better by giving them a Scottish twist. How about Scotch Lamb stirred through creamy macaroni cheese before being topped with lashings of Scottish cheddar and baked in the oven until ooey and gooey? Doesn't that just scream out midweek comfort food to you? The best bits of macaroni cheese and shepherd’s pie all rolled into one. What's not to like?


    The blue 'Scotch Lamb' label is what I always look out for when choosing my lamb. Whilst many people tend to associate eating lamb with springtime, for Scotch Lamb the best time of year is the autumn when it's at its peak of seasonality. The Scotch Lamb label has European PGI status which ensures quality, safety and taste. The label also guarantees traceability of the meat from farm to fork and only selected Scottish farms which meet stringent criteria regarding welfare, feeds and natural production methods produce Scotch Lamb. Lamb is also naturally rich in protein, low in sodium and provides seven vitamins and minerals that contribute towards good health and wellbeing, including zinc, potassium and vitamin B12.

    For me lamb is a natural choice for a midweek meal, particularly in minced format as its so versatile. A quick look back through my recipe archives finds it in

    In our house we have Pasta Bake Mondays. Due to a multitude of activities it's one night of the week when no one is around at the same time to eat together. Dancing, Jog Scotland, Air Cadets, Duke of Edinburgh's Award and Rock Choir mean that everyone eats on the run, by themselves and at different points of the evening. Pretty much par for the course in a busy family. I can get a pasta bake like my Scotch Lamb Mac and Cheese made during the day, then pop it in the oven ready for the first person to serve themselves up a portion. Later incumbents can give it a blast in the microwave and any leftovers become lunch the following day. You will need three separate pans on the go for the three elements of this dish but don't let this put you off, it's still very much a fuss free midweek meal that will be enjoyed by the whole family.

    For further Scotch Lamb inspiration take a look at

    Scotch Lamb Mac and Cheese

    500g Scotch Lamb Mince
    1 Onion, finely chopped

    600ml Milk
    60g Plain Flour
    60g Butter
    Salt & Pepper
    1 tsp English Mustard powder
    100g Scottish Cheddar Cheese

    250g Macaroni
    100g Scottish Cheddar Cheese

    If you are going to be baking and serving immediately, set the oven to 180c degrees, otherwise you'll just need the hob for now and the oven when you come to reheat the dish.

    You'll need three separate pans on the go for the three elements of this recipe:

    Mince
    Put the Scotch Lamb Mince in a pan and stir gently until broken up and browned. 
    Add the finely chopped onion and fry until softened.
    Bring to the boil then turn down the heat and simmer gently for 20 minutes. 
    Drain off any excess fat.

    Macaroni
    Cook the macaroni in boiling salted water according to the packet instructions, drain and set aside. 

    Cheese Sauce
    Put the milk in a saucepan, add the flour, butter and seasonings and bring everything gradually up to simmering point over a medium heat. Whisk continuously with a balloon whisk until the sauce has thickened and becomes smooth and glossy. Add the grated Scottish Cheddar and whisk until melted, taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. 

    Combine together the mince, macaroni and cheese sauce and tip into a a large ovenproof dish. 
    Top with the remaining 100g of Scottish Cheddar Cheese.
    If cooking immediately, bake for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown and bubbling. 
    If cooking from chilled it will require 45-50 minutes.


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    Disclosure: This is a commissioned post for Quality Meat Scotland. As always, all views expressed are my own.
    Thank you for supporting the brands who make it possible for me as a passionate Scottish Food Blogger to continue to share my Edible Food and Travel Adventures with you. I’m super choosy who I work with and promise to bring you only the cream of the crop.

  • Beetroot and Chocolate Muffins

    foodiequine.co.uk | Sat, 22 Sep 2018 20:41:00 +0000

    One of your 5-a-day in chocolate and cake form. These Beetroot and Chocolate Muffins are quick and easy to make and super moist and moreish. Use beetroot to make a naturally pink icing to finish them off to perfection.


    One of the runaway successes this year in our wee garden vegetable patch has been beetroot. So far I've roasted it, frittered it and I've got some chutney plans still to come. It's not so long ago that carrot cake was seen as a wee bit out there however now it's a fairly standard bake. Following close on its heels was beetroot and chocolate cake which is the inspiration for today's recipe. (for more vegetables in cakes inspiration do check out my blogger buddy Kate at

    The observant among you may notice that in the finished photo of the muffins they are in different cases to what they started out in for the prep and work in progress photos. Basically it turns out that I don't like those wee cup paper cases. Firstly they are smaller than regular ones and secondly you can't actually peel them off so you have to eat the muffin with a spoon. Because of that and due to some purple icing issues there were infact three batches of Beetroot and Chocolate Muffins made before I got to this stage. You can be assured that this recipe really has been thoroughly tried and tested.

    Find more of my muffins recipes at

    Beetroot and Chocolate Muffins
    Makes 12

    Ingredients
    225g Plain Flour
    50g Cocoa Powder
    1/2 tsp Bicarbonate of Soda
    2 tsp Baking Powder
    1/2 tsp Salt
    100g Light Brown Soft Sugar Sugar
    60g Porridge Oats
    1 Free Range Egg
    250ml Milk
    100ml Scottish Rapeseed Oil (or alternative vegetable/corn oil)
    1 tsp Vanilla Extract
    125g roughly grated Beetroot

    Icing
    200g Icing Sugar
    Beetroot Juice

    Preheat the oven to 190c and place paper cases in a 12 hole muffin tin.
    In a large bowl sift together the flour, cocoa powder, raising agents, salt and sugar. Then add the oats.
    In a separate bowl beat the egg together with the milk, oil and vanilla extract.
    Peel and grate the beetroot. Use rubber or disposable gloves to avoid staining you hands.
    Squeeze out a couple of tablespoons of juice from the beetroot and set aside to make the icing.
    Add the grated beetroot to the dry ingredients.
    Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry mixture and stir until just combined.
    Spoon into the prepared tin and bake for 20 minutes or until they spring back when pressed gently.

    Whilst the muffins are cooking make the icing by sieving the sugar and combining it with the reserved beetroot juice. Add a little at a time to get the desired consistency.
    Drizzle the beetroot icing over the cooled muffins using a disposable piping bag or spoon.


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  • 75 International Rice Recipes from Around the World

    foodiequine.co.uk | Tue, 18 Sep 2018 23:30:00 +0000

  • Ultimate visitor guide to the Dundee V&A

    foodiequine.co.uk | Fri, 14 Sep 2018 10:31:00 +0000

  • Edible Scottish Adventures August 2018

    foodiequine.co.uk | Mon, 03 Sep 2018 20:37:00 +0000

  • My top 10 quirky places and things to eat in London

    foodiequine.co.uk | Fri, 24 Aug 2018 15:52:00 +0000

  • Aberdeen Airport Northern Lights Executive Lounge

    foodiequine.co.uk | Thu, 16 Aug 2018 12:56:00 +0000

  • International Sunday Brunch at Fairmont St Andrews

    foodiequine.co.uk | Wed, 08 Aug 2018 20:19:00 +0000

  • Edible Scottish Adventures - July 2018

    foodiequine.co.uk | Mon, 06 Aug 2018 21:01:00 +0000

  • 36 hours in Dundee, the city of Discovery, Design and the V&A

    foodiequine.co.uk | Thu, 02 Aug 2018 22:02:00 +0000

  • Bruschetta with Jerte Picota Cherries, Serrano Ham, and Goat Cheese

    foodiequine.co.uk | Sun, 29 Jul 2018 23:30:00 +0000


    Post in collaboration with

    I'm back with more seasonal Jerte Picota Cherries for which I make absolutely no apology about. These delicious fruity treats are only around for a short six week season so you need to make the most of them whilst you can. Following on from my recipe for

    We're halfway through the season now but there's still time to grab some PDO Jerte Picota Cherries from Sainsburys, Tesco, Morrisons or Aldi. These juicy Spanish gems are handpicked into chestnut baskets with their stalks left behind on the branches. The variety is native to the beautiful valley of Jerte, in northern Spain where they have been cultivated since the 17th century. Their journey to our plates is steeped in tradition and history with growing methods and harvesting techniques being handed down through the generations. The flavour is a real taste explosion - sweet, perfectly ripe with a slight crunch. 


    Bruschetta with Jerte Picota Cherries, Serrano Ham, Goat Cheese & Cherry Balsamic Drizzle
    Makes 16 

    250g Jerte Picota Cherries
    100ml Balsamic vinegar
    4 slices wholemeal seeded bread
    70g Spanish Serrano ham slices
    125g Soft goat cheese

    To make your cherry balsamic drizzle, blitz together 50g of stoned Jerte Picota Cherries in a blender or food processor along with the balsamic vinegar. 
    Boil the resulting liquid in a small pan until the quantity has reduced to a couple of tablespoonfuls. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.
    Meanwhile, preheat your grill and toast the bread on each side.
    Use a serrated knife to cut off the crusts and carefully slice horizontally through the toast to give two thin slices. 
    Cut each slice diagonally in half then toast the uncooked side of the triangles until crispy 
    They will curl up a little at the edges but this is normal.
    Spread each slice of melba toast with goat cheese, top with torn Serrano ham and a couple of stoned and halved Jerte Picota Cherries.
    Drizzle with the cherry balsamic and serve.


    For further Jerte Picota Cherry inspiration have a look at these delicious newly created recipes from my fellow food bloggers

    Disclosure: This is a commissioned post for Jerte Picota Cherries. As always, all views expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands who make it possible for me as a passionate Scottish Food Blogger to continue to share my Edible Food and Travel Adventures with you. I’m super choosy who I work with and promise to bring you only the cream of the crop.

  • Newtonhill Pipe Band, Pipers for Peace 1918-2018, Amiens

    foodiequine.co.uk | Sat, 28 Jul 2018 22:17:00 +0000

  • Bulgar Wheat Salad with Jerte Picota Cherries, Feta and Pistachios

    foodiequine.co.uk | Wed, 18 Jul 2018 08:56:00 +0000

    Post in collaboration with

    So when it came to my own seasonal cherry recipes I knew I wanted to go savoury. I've got something up my sleeve with goat cheese and cured meat for next week but for now I've gone with feta and pistachios. Neither of which the thesaurus mentioned but I think they are missing a trick! Bulgar could easily be substituted for cous cous, quinoa or pearl barley depending on your preference and the pistachios could be swapped out for pecans, walnuts or hazelnuts. Keep things simple by using a stock cube to cook the bulgar wheat and shop bought honey and mustard dressing to toss the salad in. Nasturtiums are flourishing in my garden at the moment and I couldn't resist adding some of their vibrant peppery flavour and summer colours to my finished dish. However they are by no means essential and the contrasting colours of cherry red, feta white and pistachio green already paint a pretty picture. The first bite is eaten with our eyes after all.


    When it comes to seasonal foods its all about the timing and with Jerte Picota Cherries you only have a six week window of opportunity. Native to the beautiful Jerte Valley in Northern Spain

    Bulgar Wheat Salad with Jerte Picota Cherries, Feta and Pistachios
    Serves 4

    100g Bulgar Wheat
    500ml Vegetable Stock made with boiling water and a stock cube
    100g Feta
    25g Rocket
    50g Pistachios
    200g Jerte Picota Cherries
    2 Tbsp Honey & Mustard Dressing
    Salt & Pepper
    Edible Flowers to garnish (optional)

    Place the bulgar wheat in a large bowl, pour over the hot vegetable stock and leave for 30 minutes. Drain off any remaining liquid.
    Alternatively cook the bulgar wheat according to the packet instructions.
    Meanwhile prepare the remainder of the salad ingredients. Roughly chop the pistachios, cube or crumble the Feta and stone and half the Jerte Picota Cherries.
    Add the feta, rocket, pistachios and cherries to the bulgar wheat and stir gently to combine.
    Add the honey and mustard dressing, mix, taste and season with freshly ground salt and pepper.
    Transfer to a serving dish and garnish with edible flowers.




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    Disclosure: This is a commissioned post for Jerte Picota Cherries. As always, all views expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands who make it possible for me as a passionate Scottish Food Blogger to continue to share my Edible Food and Travel Adventures with you. I’m super choosy who I work with and promise to bring you only the cream of the crop.

  • 50+ perfect pairings with Jerte Picota Cherries

    foodiequine.co.uk | Fri, 13 Jul 2018 11:34:00 +0000

  • Hush a bye don't you cry, Mammy’s off to the WRI

    foodiequine.co.uk | Wed, 11 Jul 2018 21:09:00 +0000

    Originally published on the Scottish Women's Institutes website as a guest blog post
  • Jean Benzie

    Ardmiddle SWRI - 1950's

    Membership skipped a generation as my Mum never joined the SWRI. I fear perhaps she got fed up of having to travel in the boot of the car whilst all the bulbs and baking went in the back seat! However her ‘Rural’ upbringing certainly flourished as she became a cookery demonstrator with the Hydro Board, was involved with the Young Farmers’ Club and an active participant in her local agricultural society’s Flower Show and ‘Seed and Root’ show.

    Furthering the SWI tradition, my younger sister has recently joined her local Institute after moving to a new town. It’s been an ideal way for her to get to know people with similar interests. Admittedly she is one of the more youthful members of the group, but hasn’t found that a barrier as all the members have such a wide range of skills and experience. It’s given her an excuse to bake, to try her hand at flower arranging and learn some new crafting skills. Following in our Granny’s footsteps she’s already exhibited in the Federation bulb and baking show and the handicraft shows, even picking up a coveted double gold star. She is currently waiting patiently for next year’s schedule to appear so she can start project planning - and she continues to dream of winning a deerskin handbag.

    Sam and Jean Benzie
    On the cakestand are Ministers Slices, Shortbread and Cornflake Biscuits

    My own interests in food have certainly been influenced by both my mother and grandmother and I often turn to a trusty SWRI cookbook when looking for a recipe, particularly if it’s something more traditional. I’ve got a couple of handwritten books of my Granny’s recipes and have shared her Jeannette Benzie - Hydro Board Cookery Demonstrator
    Getting back to basics, what could possibly be more traditional and Scottish than oats and oatmeal. My Granda Sam Benzie ate it for breakfast every single day. I’ve stepped away from brose and porridge with a modern twist on these traditional ingredients by using them as a coating for chicken nuggets. Oven baked with spray oil rather than fried and with all the health benefits of oats, my

    The SWI is Scotland’s leading member based organisation created by women in 1917, designed to bring women together, with a vision to welcome every woman in Scotland to join them. They are here to educate, to share, to campaign, to learn, to socialise, to build a community and of course, to have fun. From life skills and arts and crafts to raising awareness of current affairs affecting women and helping inform government issues, the SWI is proud of its heritage and future vision.
    Fancy being part of the SWI. Join them to learn how to make that perfect scone… and a bit more too!

  • Edible Scottish Adventures - June 2018

    foodiequine.co.uk | Thu, 05 Jul 2018 19:33:00 +0000

  • Maggie's Kitchen Table and Aberdeen Culture Crawl

    foodiequine.co.uk | Fri, 29 Jun 2018 12:02:00 +0000

  • Barbecued Chicken Wings with Nut Butter and Maple Syrup

    foodiequine.co.uk | Tue, 26 Jun 2018 11:09:00 +0000

    Post in collaboration with


    I love a barbecue as much as the next person but had pretty much always gone for the convenience of gas over the (perceived) hassle of charcoal. My 15 year old son appears to be on a mission to change my mind. He's always been a bit of a foodie, will eat pretty much anything (bar bananas and sultanas) and watches a lot of food channels on You Tube. He came across BBQ Champ on ITV and DJ BBQ via Food Tube and got bitten by the BBQ bug. I introduced him to barbecue guru Marcus of

    He started buying gadgets - chimney starter, luftlighter, BBQ utensils and getting down and dirty with them in the garden accompanied by my rather neglected Webber Grill. His first major cook was a hefty 3kg brisket, followed by a whole leg of lamb. For Christmas granny gave him a voucher to attend a BBQ basics class with


    On return from his course he was raving about a new gadget. The



    For chicken the magic number you are looking for on your Thermapen is 75°C. Just remember seventy five stay alive. In addition to ensuring that it's up to temperature you should also check that there’s no pink meat and that the juices run clear. Remember to use separate tongs, utensils and plates for raw and cooked chicken, and regularly wash your hands. Enough of the safety advice, lets get back to the recipe. There are only three ingredients, bar salt and pepper, so make sure you use the best. You could of course use peanut butter however of late I've become smitten by the huge range of other varieties of nut butter on the market. When I made these I used Crunchy ABC Mix from Hungry Squirrel. This is a delicious and crunchy blend of almonds, brazil nuts and cashews with a touch of sea salt and is made just up the road from me in Deeside. Maple syrup gives a wonderful sticky sweetness and caramelisation to the wings. Do make sure you use pure maple syrup and not maple flavoured syrup. The difference is like night and day. Maple wood chips are an optional extra if you want some additional smokiness.




    Barbecued Chicken Wings with Nut Butter and Maple Syrup

    750g Chicken Wings (12 wings)
    50g Nut Butter
    50ml Maple Syrup
    Salt & Pepper
    Maple Wood Chips

    Soak the maple wood chips in water for at least 30 minutes.
    Pre-light charcoal with a chimney starter.
    Tip all of the lit charcoal into the middle of the barbecue.
    Squeeze the wood chips to remove excess moisture and sprinkle on top of the charcoal.
    Allow the grill to come up to temperature.
    Meanwhile mix together the nut butter, maple syrup, salt and pepper and rub into the chicken wings. 
    Place the chicken wings around the edges of the grill so they are over indirect heat.
    With the lid closed allow them to sear for approx 5 minutes or until they release naturally, don't be afraid to let them char.
    Turn the wings over, working round in a circle
    Continue to cook with the lid closed until an internal temperature of 75°C is reached.
    You really want the skin to go nice and crispy so if any look like they need it you can move them over the direct heat to crisp up further before serving.


    To cook Chicken Wings with Nut Butter and Maple Syrup on a gas BBQ...
    The soaked wood chips can be used in a barbecue smoker box or placed in a pouch of tinfoil with holes stabbed in it. 
    Cook the wings over a medium heat until a temperature of 75°C is reached keeping the lid closed throughout the cooking process.


    Electronic Temperature Instruments have provided a Thermapen IR infrared thermometer with foldaway probe as a giveaway for readers of Foodie Quine. Prize value is £72. To be in with a chance of winning the Thermapen IR enter via the rafflecopter widget below. 

    Giveaway ends 14th July 2018 11.59pm Good Luck!


    Disclosure: This is a commissioned post for Thermapen. As always, all views expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands who make it possible for me as a passionate Scottish Food Blogger to continue to share my Edible Food and Travel Adventures with you. I’m super choosy who I work with and promise to bring you only the cream of the crop.

  • Quick Green Spaghetti Sauce with Avocado, Peas and Spinach

    foodiequine.co.uk | Wed, 20 Jun 2018 22:38:00 +0000

    A vibrant green sauce for spaghetti that's made in minutes. It's packed with goodness, super creamy and it coats the pasta beautifully. Taken from 'Living on the Veg' by Clive Gifford and Jacqueline Meldrum. A kids guide to life without meat.


    Whilst I don't have any cookbook ambitions of my own I'm always delighted to support my fellow food bloggers with their successful publications. As such today I'm sharing a recipe from Scottish Blogger Jacqueline Meldrum of

    I absolutely loved the recipe that I tried and have reproduced with permission below. I'm not a huge fan of tomato based pasta sauces and tend to opt for the more calorific creamy/cheesy options. However I may well now have found a new favourite! The colour of the sauce was amazingly vibrant and the taste and texture super creamy. I used cashew rather than cows milk and also finished off my dish with a sprinkling of toasted pine nuts. Next time I'm going to try swapping out the peas for Edamame (soya) beans. 


    Quick Green Spaghetti Sauce with Avocado, Peas and Spinach
    Serves 4

    Reproduced with permission of Wayland Books

    300g spaghetti
    1 ripe avocado, skin and stone removed
    100g frozen peas
    1 handful spinach leaves
    1 handful fresh coriander
    1 handful fresh parsley
    4 Tbsp vegetarian Parmesan style cheese (or mature cheddar)
    200ml milk
    a pinch of salt and pepper
    • Cook the spaghetti in a large pan of boiling water according to the packet instructions, then drain and return to the pot.
    • While the spaghetti is cooking, whizz up the avocado, peas, spinach, herbs, cheese and milk in a blender or food processor.
    • Season with a pinch of salt and pepper.
    • Pour the sauce over your cooked spaghetti, stir in and warm a little over a low heat.
    • Serve in bowls topped with a sprinkle of cheese (I also added toasted pine nuts)
    • Enjoy!

    For a further taste of what to expect from Living on the Veg check out these posts from some more of Jac's blogging colleagues
    • Elizabeth's Kitchen Diary -

  • Cranachan Flapjacks with Whisky Icing Drizzle

    foodiequine.co.uk | Mon, 11 Jun 2018 22:09:00 +0000

    Post in collaboration with

    Whilst Scotland is known for many great dishes and a fantastic natural larder I'm not sure if anything brings them all together quite like Cranachan does. This traditional dish combines honey, whisky, raspberries, oats and cream into a delicious dessert. I've used it as my inspiration for a twist on a flapjack made with Hamlyns Oats and Oatmeal. Raspberries are incorporated in jam form and honey binds the flapjack together. There's just a tablespoon of Whisky in the icing drizzle but if you'd prefer a teetotal version this can be substituted for water. The combination of both oats and oatmeal provided a wonderful texture and is something I'm going to be using in all my flapjacks going forward. 

    This recipe is one of three for oat bars which have recently been published in a promotional leaflet commissioned by

    Hamlyns of Scotland is part of a family food business which started milling oats in 1888. Their traditional range of Oats and Oatmeal is produced from premium Scottish oats, grown and milled in Scotland - 100% Scottish from seed to mill to finished product. Hamlyns work closely with a network of farmers across Scotland, with the majority of their supplier located in the north east of Scotland, near their oat mill at Boyndie in Banffshire, in the heart of Scotland’s oat growing countryside. The mill is still one of the most modern oat processing mills in Europe, combining the latest oat milling techniques with traditional customs. In 2012 the installation of a wind turbine made them the first oat mill in modern times to be fully powered by wind.


    Cranachan Flapjacks with Whisky Icing Drizzle
    Makes 24

    Ingredients
    Flapjacks
    150g Salted Butter
    100g Golden Caster Sugar
    3 Tbsp Honey
    300g Hamlyns Scottish Porridge Oats
    100g Hamlyns Pinhead Oatmeal
    200g Raspberry Jam

    Whisky Icing
    50g Icing Sugar
    1 Tbsp Whisky (or water for a teetotal version) 

    Preheat your oven to 160c degrees and grease/line a 34cm x 20cm tray bake tin.
    Melt together the butter, golden caster sugar and honey over a low heat in a good sized pan.
    Once melted, stir in the Hamlyns porridge oats and oatmeal and mix until well combined.
    Tip half of the flapjack mixture into the prepared tin and smooth down firmly with the back of a metal spoon.
    Carefully spread the raspberry jam over the base flapjack - you may find this easier if you give it a good mix or warm it first. 
    Sprinkle the remaining oat mixture over the jam and again firm down well. 
    Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the edges are just beginning to turn golden.
    Cut the cranachan flapjack into 24 squares whilst still warm, but leave them to fully cool in the tin.
    To make the whisky icing sieve the icing sugar into a bowl, add the whisky and beat until smooth. The consistency should be that of double cream. 
    Drizzle the whisky icing over the cranachan flapjacks using a disposable piping bag or spoon.
    Once the icing has set recut the flapjacks and remove them from the baking tin.


    Linking up to

    Hamlyns have recently teamed up with renowned Scottish designer Gillian Kyle to produce a range of branded merchandise. These items are not available to puchase however readers of Foodie Quine have the chance to win a bundle of Hamlyns breakfast goodies which include them. The prize worth £70 consists of 2 x Porridge Bowls, 2 x Mugs, tea towel, apron, spurtle, tote bag, oats and oatmeal.

    To be in with a chance of winning the Hamlyns prize bundle enter via the rafflecopter widget below. 
    Giveaway ends 30th June 2018 11.59pm Good Luck!

    a Rafflecopter giveaway

    Disclosure: This is a commissioned post for Hamlyns. As always, all views expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands who make it possible for me as a passionate Scottish Food Blogger to continue to share my Edible Food and Travel Adventures with you. I’m super choosy who I work with and promise to bring you only the cream of the crop.

  • Edible Scottish Adventures - May 2018

    foodiequine.co.uk | Thu, 07 Jun 2018 14:11:00 +0000

  • BBQ Percy Pig Pork Loin Steaks

    foodiequine.co.uk | Wed, 30 May 2018 14:05:00 +0000

    What better match for the BBQ? Juicy tender pork loin steaks topped with sticky caramelised Marks & Spencer Percy Pigs. Think gammon steak and pineapple - only better! This little piggy went to the barbecue...




    I have a feeling that this might be a Marmite recipe. As in you will either love it or hate it. Certainly when I shared it as a work in progress on twitter and instagram the reaction ranged from 'Omggggg so clever' to 'was this a dare?'
    Personally I think it's a work of genius but I'm prepared to accept that not everyone might see it like that. In my mind surely there is no better culinary match than Pork and Percy Pig. Pop down to your local butcher for some quality pork and M&S for the iconic gummy sweets and give it a try! Think gammon steak and pineapple - only better. 


    My teenage son is the BBQ guru of the Foodie Quine household so he was very much in charge of the cooking of this dish - I was just the creative genius behind it all and of course as always will take all the glory on social media ;-) We cooked these on a Weber BBQ with Oxford Charcoal Company charcoal and Weber Apple Wood Chips soaked in apple juice. The pork loins were very briefly seared on both sides over direct heat before being transferred to indirect until they reached the magic internal temperature of 71 In addition to being topped with Percy, they were also sprayed with apple juice whilst cooking.

    Pork + Apple + Percy Pig = Porcine Heaven!


    BBQ Percy Pig Pork Loin Steaks

    4 Pork Loin Steaks (we used

    To cook on a gas BBQ...
    The soaked wood chips can be used in a barbecue smoker box or placed in a pouch of tinfoil with holes stabbed in it. 
    Sear the pork initially directly over a high flame then move off the heat to an adjacent switched off burner whilst keeping the original burner switched on. 
    Keep the lid closed throughout the cooking process.



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  • Jersey Royals with Wild Garlic and Lemon

    foodiequine.co.uk | Wed, 23 May 2018 23:30:00 +0000

    Post in collaboration with

    My paternal Grandfather Alexander Cameron was a Potato Farmer on The Black Isle. As a little girl I recall nothing better than the taste of his homegrown new tatties served with salty butter. The main varieties he grew were Duke of York, Epicure and Kerr's Pink, much of which was sold to the local chip shop. I don't know about you but when I think of new potatoes the ones that spring to mind are Jersey Royals. So how come my Granda wasn't growing them? Because he wasn't in Jersey is the simple answer! In this instance the clue is in the name and Jersey Royals can only be grown on the island of Jersey. 
    (please tell me I'm not the only one that didn't know that?!) 


    Jersey Royals are delicious, earthy and nutty and one of the traditional foodie signals that Spring has arrived. Following a slight delay this year due to the 'beast from the east' they are in season now and available both prepacked and loose in

    Jersey Royals are ideal for boiling or steaming but are equally versatile for roasting too (I love making Hasslebacks with them) The potatoes are delivered direct from Jersey and are distinctive by their kidney shape, waxy texture and delicate skins. I've showcased them in this recipe alongside one of my other favourite flavours of spring. Wild Garlic. We're heading towards the end of the wild garlic season so in addition to the leaves you can also use the flowers. For wild garlic foraging and identification advice take a look at the

    Jersey Royals with Wild Garlic and Lemon 
    serves 4 

    If you wish to serve this hot you can use either butter or oil, however to serve as a warm salad it's best to use oil. If wild garlic is not available substitute chopped chives and purple chive flowers. 

    600g Tesco Jersey Royal new potatoes 
    Handful of wild garlic leaves, washed and dried 
    25g butter (or 1 Tbsp rapeseed oil) 
    Zest of a lemon 
    Juice of 1/2 a lemon 
    Black pepper 
    Wild garlic flowers, washed and dried 

    Wash the Jersey Royal new potatoes - no need to peel - and cook them in boiling salted water for 15-20 minutes until tender. 
    Meanwhile wash and dry the wild garlic leaves and flowers. How much you use will depend on how garlicy you want your dish to be and at what point in the season you've been foraging - early shoots are the most pungent. 
    Roll the wild garlic leaves up tightly and cut them into thin shreds. 
    Drain the potatoes, cut into bitesized pieces and set aside. 
    Add the butter (or oil) to the pan along with the lemon zest, juice and shredded wild garlic leaves. Allow the butter to melt and the garlic to wilt.
    Return the potatoes to the pan, mix well to combine and season with black pepper. 
    Tip into a serving bowl and top with individually segmented wild garlic flowers plus a couple of whole flower heads. 
    Jersey Royals with Wild Garlic and Lemon can now be served immediately or left to cool slightly and served as a warm salad. 



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    Disclosure: This is a commissioned post for Tesco. As always, all views expressed are my own. Thank you for supporting the brands who make it possible for me as a passionate Scottish Food Blogger to continue to share my Edible Food and Travel Adventures with you. I’m super choosy who I work with and promise to bring you only the cream of the crop.

  • Cookery Courses & Foodie Experiences in Aberdeen City & Shire

    foodiequine.co.uk | Thu, 17 May 2018 08:09:00 +0000

  • Spiced Courgette, Carrot and Feta Fritters

    foodiequine.co.uk | Sun, 13 May 2018 21:50:00 +0000

    Fritters are surely the single most delicious way to deal with a glut in the garden! These lightly spiced vegetarian courgette (zucchini) and carrot fritters contain feta cheese for a tangy flavour. Whilst they work well as a side they are also great for breakfast and surprisingly tasty served cold in a packed lunch or picnic.



    My Granda Monearn was a fantastic gardener. A greenhouse full of the best smelling and tasting tomatoes ever, luscious strawberries protected under a net and laid on straw and three carefully weeded and precisely laid out vegetable patches. I also vividly recall him storing his onions in old pairs of my Granny's American tan tights! I'm assuming that there must have been some method in such apparent madness?! My own exploits in vegetables haven't been quite as fruitful partly due to the fact that I only have a couple of raised beds, nevertheless nothing tastes better than something you have lovingly grown yourself, protected from the ravages of weeds and slugs and harvested with your own fair hands. I was delighted to be approached by Aberdeen's Duthie Park as part of their National Gardening Week event line up to host a Vegetable Cookery Workshop within the Education Room of the Winter Gardens. Alas all my ingredients came from the supermarket - bar the foraged wild garlic - but hopefully the event provided some inspiration to the real gardeners who attended.

    Holding an event in a new or unusual space is always tricky. How many people can we fit in? Will anyone actually book a place? Such worries proved unfounded as the event was quickly fully booked with 16 people and a waiting list. On the menu for demoing and tasting were six dishes to be followed by a practical element with all the participants making their own jars of pickled veg to take home. To kick things off we got our vegetable tastebuds tingling with Carrot & Ginger and Beetroot, Apple & Ginger juices. I'd made these in the morning rather than haul my juicer along with me. It already seemed like I was bringing everything but the kitchen sink! Even a ladybird hitched a ride along with the wild garlic. 


    Once Mrs ladybird had been safely re homed, the wild garlic made its way into pretty much all of the dishes. First up was a Kale Pesto inspired by the one we made on my trip to

    Next up was a slaw recipe from BBQ guru Marcus Bawdon of

    Courgette, Carrot and Feta Fritters
    Makes 10-12

    300g courgette/zucchini coarsely grated
    300g carrot, coarsely grated
    50g self raising flour
    1 free range egg, beaten
    3 spring onions, finely chopped
    1 garlic clove, finely chopped
    100g feta cheese, crumbled
    1 tsp cumin seeds
    1 tsp corriander
    ½ tsp dried chilli flakes 
    salt & pepper
    oil for frying

    To make the fritters, put the grated courgette and carrot in a large mixing bowl lined with a j-cloth or clean tea towel. Squeeze hard to drain out as much liquid as you can and ensure the vegetables are as dry as possible.
    Dispose of the liquid and return the grated veg to the bowl, add the flour and eggs and mix well. Then add the spring onions, garlic ***we used wild garlic to replace both of these*** feta, spices, chilli and seasoning.
    Heat a tablespoon of oil in a frying pan over a medium heat.
    Scoop heaped spoonfuls of the fritter mixture into the pan patting them down so they flatten slightly in the pan. 
    Fry gently until golden brown on both sides. 
    Drain on kitchen paper and keep warm until all the fritters are ready.


    To round off the event everyone made a jar of pickled vegetables to take home. This was based on the



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