WCBU Classical (128k MP3)

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WCBU Classical (128k MP3)

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WCBU 89.9, Peoria Public Radio, Public Media from Bradley University, NPR for central Illinois
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  • House Lawmakers Open Investigation Into Capitol Attack

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 05:12:00

    The U.S. House of Representatives has opened an investigation into this month's attack on the U.S. Capitol. In a letter to the heads of America's leading intelligence and law enforcement agencies, House lawmakers asked for any information that could help them understand whether warning signs were missed. Lawmakers want to know what the intelligence community and federal law enforcement knew about the threats of violence and whether that information was shared with the right people. Capitol Police have said they were unprepared for the ferocity of the attack, which left one of its officers dead . "Security and logistical preparations before January 6 were not consistent with the prospect of serious and widespread violence," lawmakers wrote Saturday. "Yet, according to media accounts that have surfaced in recent days, federal and other authorities earlier on possessed — and may have shared with some parties — intelligence and other information forecasting a dire security threat against

  • Man Arrested Near Capitol With Loaded Handgun And 500 Rounds Of Ammunition

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 05:06:00

    U.S. Capitol Police say they arrested the driver of a truck who presented unauthorized inauguration credentials at a security checkpoint near the Capitol and was in possession of a loaded handgun and hundreds of rounds of ammunition. Police said Wesley Allen Beeler was arrested shortly after 6:30 p.m. Friday night after stopping at a checkpoint. Authorities said one officer noticed several firearms-related decals on Beeler's truck, including one that said, "If they come for your guns Give 'Em your bullets first." When asked, Beeler admitted to having a Glock in the vehicle. Police say that in addition to the loaded handgun, they recovered more than 500 rounds of 9mm ammunition and 21 shotgun shells in the truck. Beeler, who is from Virginia, was charged Saturday with carrying a pistol without a license. Beeler's family told The Washington Post they were surprised by the arrest, because Beeler works in private security and had said he was working on security near the Capitol. Records

  • Civil Rights Attorneys On Biden Administration Plans For Law Enforcement Reforms

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 05:02:00

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: President-elect Joe Biden has compared the challenges he faces coming into office to those faced by Franklin Delano Roosevelt when he became president in 1932. And like FDR, Biden wants to meet the moment with bold action and an ambitious legislative agenda that includes most urgently passage of his proposed $1.9 trillion pandemic economic relief package. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) JOE BIDEN: It includes much more, like an increase in the minimum wage to at least $15 an hour. People tell me that's going to be hard to pass. Florida just passed it. As divided as that state is, they just passed it. The rest of the country's ready to move as well. MARTIN: Biden and his supporters also want sweeping measures to address climate change, health care and tax reform, among other priorities. But to get anything passed in Congress, Biden and his team will have to contend with political realities on Capitol Hill, especially in the Senate, where the chamber will be split

  • Biden To Quickly Sign Orders Mandating Masks, Reversing Trump Travel Ban And More

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 04:40:00

    For more than a year and a half, President-elect Joe Biden campaigned promising to undo several Trump administration policies on Day 1 of his presidency, and now his team is filling in the details of that and more as he prepares to take office. Biden's incoming chief of staff, Ron Klain, on Saturday laid out in a memo the executive orders the new president will issue on Jan. 20 and in the early days of the new administration. As Biden promised from the very beginning of his campaign, he will sign an order returning the United States to the Paris climate agreement, the international accord to lower greenhouse gas emissions that the Obama administration played a lead role in crafting. President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the agreement. Biden has promised to implement sweeping changes to the energy and transportation sector to reach the country's Paris emissions goals. Biden will also sign orders to direct the Education Department to extend a pause on federal student loan payments and

  • A Measles Outbreak Offers Lessons In Public Health Messaging

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 04:30:00

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: President-elect Joe Biden has compared the challenges he faces coming into office to those faced by Franklin Delano Roosevelt when he became president in 1932. And like FDR, Biden wants to meet the moment with bold action and an ambitious legislative agenda that includes most urgently passage of his proposed $1.9 trillion pandemic economic relief package. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) JOE BIDEN: It includes much more, like an increase in the minimum wage to at least $15 an hour. People tell me that's going to be hard to pass. Florida just passed it. As divided as that state is, they just passed it. The rest of the country's ready to move as well. MARTIN: Biden and his supporters also want sweeping measures to address climate change, health care and tax reform, among other priorities. But to get anything passed in Congress, Biden and his team will have to contend with political realities on Capitol Hill, especially in the Senate, where the chamber will be split

  • When An Ambitious White House Agenda Meets A Split Senate

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 04:30:00

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: President-elect Joe Biden has compared the challenges he faces coming into office to those faced by Franklin Delano Roosevelt when he became president in 1932. And like FDR, Biden wants to meet the moment with bold action and an ambitious legislative agenda that includes most urgently passage of his proposed $1.9 trillion pandemic economic relief package. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) JOE BIDEN: It includes much more, like an increase in the minimum wage to at least $15 an hour. People tell me that's going to be hard to pass. Florida just passed it. As divided as that state is, they just passed it. The rest of the country's ready to move as well. MARTIN: Biden and his supporters also want sweeping measures to address climate change, health care and tax reform, among other priorities. But to get anything passed in Congress, Biden and his team will have to contend with political realities on Capitol Hill, especially in the Senate, where the chamber will be split

  • Up To 25,000 Troops Descend On Washington For Biden's Inauguration

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 02:04:00

    Next week's swearing-in of President-elect Joe Biden will see the biggest security presence of any inauguration in U.S. history. For days, thousands of National Guard troops have been pouring into the capital, and by Wednesday's ceremony, up to 25,000 troops will be in place to guard against security threats. The nation's capital will look much different than it did in the days leading up to the attack on the U.S. Capitol building earlier this month. The area around the Capitol has been blocked off by barricades, and the National Mall is already closed to the public across its entire length — from the Capitol down to the Lincoln Memorial, 2 miles away. "We cannot allow a recurrence of the chaos and illegal activity that the United States and the world witnessed last week," Matt Miller, head of the U.S. Secret Service's Washington field office, told reporters Friday. Troops are pouring in from all over the country. "I'm sorry I have to ask you to leave your families and head down to our

  • Statehouses Brace For Potential Violence As Biden's Inauguration Approaches

    peoriapublicradio.org Sunday, 17 January 2021 01:50:00

    Governors across the nation are fortifying statehouses amid fears of possibly violent protests in the lead-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. The Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol raised fears across the nation of armed protesters amassing at statehouses. Many states began putting new security measures in place , including increasing law enforcement personnel and activating National Guard troops as legislators returned to work. The FBI specifically warned this week of potentially violent protests in all 50 states ahead of Biden's swearing-in as the nation's 46 th president. As the weekend drew near, statehouses began erecting barricades, fencing and boards as officials braced for potential violence. On Friday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, who had been the target of an alleged kidnapping plot last year, activated the state's National Guard ahead of a protest reportedly planned for Sunday. "The security enhancements that we have made are both seen —

  • Limericks

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 23:35:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit PETER SAGAL, HOST: Coming up, it's Lightning Fill In The Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-WAIT-WAIT. That's 1-888-924-8924. You can click the contact us link on our website, waitwait.npr.org. Hi. You are on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME. ANGELE: Hi. SAGAL: Hi. Who's this? ANGELE: My name is Angele (ph), and I'm calling from Boston, Mass. SAGAL: Hey, Boston - my old home. What do you do there? ANGELE: I work for an education nonprofit. I'm a team manager there. SAGAL: Well, that's cool. Education is a big thing in Boston. ANGELE: Yes, for sure. SAGAL: If you watch - basically, if you watch movies, the big industries in Boston are colleges and bank robbing. ANGELE: Right, and just Ben Affleck on his own. SAGAL: Yes. Sometimes. Ben Affleck is at college. Sometimes, he's robbing a bank. ANGELE: (Laughter). SAGAL: Well, welcome to the show. Bill Kurtis is

  • Lightning Fill In The Blank

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 23:35:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit PETER SAGAL, HOST: Now onto our final game, Lightning Fill In The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill-in-the-blank questions as they can. Each correct answer is now worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores? BILL KURTIS: Well, Luke has five, Negin has six, and Roxanne has six. SAGAL: All right, Luke. You are in second place. You're up first. The clock will start when I begin your first question. Fill in the blank. On Wednesday, Mitch McConnell said he wouldn't reconvene the Senate for President Trump's blank trial until after Joe Biden's inauguration. LUKE BURBANK: Impeachment. SAGAL: Right. (SOUNDBITE OF BELL) SAGAL: On Tuesday, the U.S. announced they would require negative blank tests from all international travelers. BURBANK: COVID. SAGAL: Right. (SOUNDBITE OF BELL) SAGAL: This week, former Michigan Governor Rick Snyder was charged for his lack of action over blank's water crisis. BURBANK:

  • Predictions

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 23:35:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit PETER SAGAL, HOST: Now, panel, how will they explain Samantha's absence on the show? Negin Farsad. NEGIN FARSAD: What happened is that Samantha started wearing cargo pants, and it created an insurmountable division in their friendship. (SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE SOUND EFFECT) SAGAL: Roxanne Roberts. ROXANNE ROBERTS: All those little desks finally caught up with her, but she died a happy woman. (SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE SOUND EFFECT) SAGAL: And Luke Burbank. LUKE BURBANK: She'd successfully sexed everyone in the city and moved to Utica to start the process over again. ROBERTS: (Laughter). (SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE SOUND EFFECT) BILL KURTIS: Well, if any of that happens, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME. SAGAL: Thank you, Bill Kurtis. Thanks also to Negin Farsad, Roxanne Roberts and Luke Burbank. Thanks, all of you, for listening. Hey, it's getting better, don't you think? I can feel it. I'm Peter Sagal, and we'll see you next week.

  • India Kicks Off A Massive COVID-19 Vaccination Drive

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 20:53:00

    Cheers erupted in hospital wards across India on Saturday as a first group of nurses and sanitation workers rolled up their sleeves and got vaccinated against COVID-19, at the start of what's likely to become the biggest national vaccination campaign in history. India aims to vaccinate 300 million people by July, though it could take an additional two or more years to inoculate all nearly 1.4 billion Indians. The shots are voluntary. Hospitals and clinics have been setting up and rehearsing for weeks. "A proud moment indeed! This is what we've been waiting for," Dr. R. Jayanthi, dean of the Omandurar Medical College in the southern city of Chennai, told local media moments after receiving her shot. "I'm truly a very privileged beneficiary today, and I'm feeling absolutely fine." Earlier this month, the Indian government granted emergency authorization to two vaccines — one developed by Oxford University and the pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, and a homegrown formula developed by an

  • Uganda Election: President Yoweri Museveni Declared Winner As Bobi Wine Alleges Fraud

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 19:19:00

    Updated at 9:41 a.m. ET Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term in office, fighting off a challenge by former singer Bobi Wine — who was just a child when Museveni came into power back in 1986. Wine's run drew many young Ugandans to pay attention to politics. The nation's electoral commission announced on Saturday that Museveni received 58% of the vote to 34% for Wine, according to The Associated Press. But Wine is alleging that the vote was rigged, as election officials face questions over how results were tallied amid an Internet blackout, according to the AP. Ahead of Thursday's election, Museveni's government shut down social media outlets — including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter— in Uganda. It also sent military vehicles into the streets. Soldiers and police were out in force in the capital of Kampala on Saturday. In an interview with NPR, Wine said security forces were not allowing anyone in or out of his home, and he urged Ugandans to reject the results. In a

  • Can The Forces Unleashed By Trump's Big Election Lie Be Undone?

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 18:57:00

    Last Wednesday, just before a mob of pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol in an insurrection that left five dead, the president stood before a huge crowd gathered in front of the White House for a so-called "Save America" rally. Trump whipped up his supporters , repeating a false claim that he has made over and over in the weeks since Nov. 3: "We won this election, and we won it by a landslide," he insisted. "This was not a close election!" "They say we lost," the president went on. "We didn't lose." Among the thousands of falsehoods Trump has uttered during his presidency, this one in particular has earned the distinction of being called the "big lie." It's a charged term, with connotations that trace back to its roots in Nazi Germany. Hitler used the phrase "big lie" against Jews in his manifesto Mein Kampf. Later, the Nazis' big lie — claiming that Jews led a global conspiracy and were responsible for Germany's and the world's woes — fueled anti-Semitism and the Holocaust.

  • Saturday Sports: NFL Playoffs Begin

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 18:55:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit SCOTT SIMON, HOST: And now it's time for sports. (SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) SIMON: The Beard comes to Brooklyn. Two quarterback legends meet in the playoffs this weekend. And a coach with eight Super Bowl rings - remember he won a couple as an assistant coach - says no thanks to presidential bling. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins us. Morning, Tom. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Good morning. How are you? SIMON: I'm fine. Thank you, my friend. A new Big Three in Brooklyn - Harden, Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving. All right, this has been tried before with, like, middling success in Miami. What do the Nets have to do to get maximum use out of three major stars and not have them run into each other? GOLDMAN: (Laughter) First, make sure that they are three, in fact, because right now, they are a big two, Scott. Irving - Kyrie Irving has been a mystery. He's gone AWOL. He's expected to miss his sixth-straight game tonight, the first five because of personal

  • Who Should Get The Coronavirus Vaccine? For Some States, The Honor System Rules

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 18:55:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Now that health care workers and nursing home residents are getting the COVID-19 vaccine, states wrestle with who ought to be next. So, for example, essential workers - well, who's considered essential, who's merely important? People with underlying illnesses - if so, which ones? Will you have to show proof? What kind? Many states have decided to use what amounts to the honor system to determine who should be next in line for the coronavirus vaccine. We're joined now by Dr. Jenny Arnold. She is the CEO of the Washington State Pharmacy Association and also a member of the committee that devised the state's eligibility system. Thanks so much for being with us, Dr. Arnold. JENNY ARNOLD: Thank you very much. SIMON: So you just trust everyone to be honest? ARNOLD: Well, any system can be gamed. And honestly, being able to have the best and most equitable distribution of vaccine, this seemed like the best solution to the committee.

  • How D.C. Locals Are Processing The Insurrection At The Capitol

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 18:55:00

    Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Washington, D.C., is the federal district provided in the Constitution as a home for the U.S. government. It was a new city, created a site deliberately not north or south, but on the border of a new country that was even then divided. Of course, it's become a real city, too, that's home to 700,000 people. Nobody knows that city better than Kojo Nnamdi. He's hosted "The Kojo Nnamdi Show" on WAMU for more than two decades, and he joins us now from his home in Washington, D.C. Kojo, thanks so much for being with us. KOJO NNAMDI: You're welcome, Scott. And thank you for inviting me. SIMON: A sad and anxious time - what are people you know, as you're able to get around the city, saying? NNAMDI: People feel personally attacked by what happened at the Capitol on January 6 because even though we understand that this is federal property, it is also in our town. And we are, frankly, determined that there shall never be a similar

  • Opinion: The Fringe Of America's Fabric

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 18:55:00

    I have interviewed some truly hateful people. It's part of what we have to do in the news business. As a young reporter, I spoke with Nazis who paraded in brown shirts and swastika armbands while they pursued a long legal case to march through a heavily Jewish suburb of Chicago. I never felt at ease when I went to their headquarters, with a swastika in the front window of their storefront on Chicago's southwest side. But after a few visits, I also wasn't scared. They were not like the storm troopers I'd seen in old newsreel footage, strutting alongside tanks. These storefront Nazis looked like they were playing dress-up games: young, pasty-faced, inept and stammering. No matter how much publicity they got — or we gave them — the Chicago Nazis could never turn out more than a few members. They seemed the fringe of the fringe. Years later, I had much the same impression of Ku Klux Klan members we profiled when they burned a cross at midnight in a field in Pennsylvania. Decades after the

  • Broken New Year's Resolutions Already? It's OK To Give Yourself A Break

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 18:00:00

    It's mid-January, and maybe you've resolved to lose 20 pounds this year, exercise every day, or quit drinking. And — so far — you have failed. So you give up. Sound familiar? Every new year, we are bombarded with messages like "new year, new you," but for many of us, just living through the last several months has been a major accomplishment. This year, it's OK to give ourselves a break, says Dr. Rachelle Scott , director of psychiatry at Eden Health , a concierge-style health care start-up with offices in New York, Chicago, and Washington, D.C. "There are days we're just getting up and showering and, you know, just doing basic activities of daily living. And that's OK," she says. We are far too hard on ourselves. "There are periods in time where we really need rest and we really need to heal. And I think we're in a time where that's certainly the case." Recharge your body It's a particularly trying time to be a human right now. A Kaiser Family Foundation tracking poll conducted in mid

  • Republicans Wonder How, And If, They Can Pull The Party Back Together

    peoriapublicradio.org Saturday, 16 January 2021 18:00:00

    In a matter of hours on Jan. 6, the Republican Party went from shrugging off its loss of the White House to a party in crisis. It was becoming clear just before the violent insurrection at the Capitol that the party had lost two Senate runoff elections in Georgia, making President Trump the first president since Herbert Hoover whose party lost the White House, the House and the Senate in one term. And plenty of Republicans blamed Trump for the Democrats' success in Georgia. Trump's own defeat means the GOP has failed to get a majority of votes in seven of the last eight presidential elections. Now, Trump leaves office as the only president to be impeached twice, and the House vote against Trump over the Capitol insurrection marked the most bipartisan impeachment in U.S. history. The Republican fault lines go in every direction: between the grassroots and the establishment, between big donors and aspiring presidential candidates, between House leaders and Senate leaders. Republican

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