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Radio Onda Viva
27min. ago
@ Proleter - U Can Get It +
1h. 34min. ago
+ Mister Electric Demon - Le Papillon *
2h. 35min. ago
Anitek - Under Twine
3h. 45min. ago
Wasaru - Doin' Time
4h. 52min. ago
@ Antony Raijekov - By The Coast (2004) *
6h. 4min. ago
@ Cyberdread - Martina *
7h. 11min. ago
Targetspot - Targetspot
8h. 13min. ago
+ Overnight Visitor - Fonogeri +
9h. 23min. ago
@ It's Like A Movie - Andrea Barone @
10h. 28min. ago
* Prassonissi - Andrea Barone *
11h. 43min. ago
Hanging Chilli'n - Serakina
12h. 47min. ago
Salamandre (sunlikamelo-d) - Mister Electric Demon
13h. 51min. ago
@ Akoviani - Aerial +
14h. 54min. ago
Still Waters Featuring Kate Walsh - Synthirius
16h. ago
Corso Como - Andrea Barone
17h. 3min. ago
Proleter - Street Boyz
18h. 7min. ago
+ C.j.rogers - Power Beat *
19h. 20min. ago
Doin' Time - Wasaru
20h. 22min. ago
+ Martin Eigenmann - Winter Day @
21h. 22min. ago
Good Morning Featuring Kate Walsh - Synthirius
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Radio Onda Viva  
TOP 100 P Raiting
Targetspot - Targetspot
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Gingertom - Cathouseonthekings
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Akoviani - Seven Mirrors
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Zeropage - Cold Fusion (the 2nd Jam)
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Back To You - C.j.rogers
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After Hours - Sion
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Revolution Void - Headphonetic
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Boogie Belgique - Piccadilly (s Strong Remix)
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Krayne - Outer Sanctum
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Ensono - Toralla Island (deeper Mix)
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Street Boyz - Proleter
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Luca Sampieri - 8th October
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Contempo - Ultima - Contempo - Serge Servais
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Behind The Line - Screw-jay
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Serakina - Tribute
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Electric Grocery - A Nice World
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+ Nuclear Cowboys - Nuclear Cowboys - A Morning In The City @
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Like Making Love (sin Mix) - Ensono
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Beach Party - Martin Eigenmann
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Reno Project - The Field
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Akusmatic - Lapislazuli - Akusmatic
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Space Off - Ben Othman
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Ben Othman - Hamammet
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C.j.rogers - Neon Angels
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Chill Carrier - That Universe In My Barn
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@ Chill Carrier - Beautiful Flow +
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Ska One - Highmas
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K4mmerer - Sunrise
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Ay - 14ice - Ham D's Style - Behind The Wall (relax)
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Mindthings - Spring
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Fonogeri - Balaton Night Groove
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Spring - Mindthings
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Moments In Slow Motion - Transient
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Basement Skylights - Strings
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Walking Home - General Fuzz
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Pianochocolate - Jean Honeymoon - Bang Bang (pianochocolate Remix)
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* Boom Boom Beckett - Salsa Di Soy (fabius Remix) +
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Stay For This Moment (medicisoundsystem Feat. Snowflake) - Ccmixter
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Jason Pfaff - Will I See A Brighter Day
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* Cyberdread - Roots Music - Nu-jazz Club Vers +
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Akoviani - Timeless
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Doin' Time - Wasaru
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Ben Othman - Jerba Feat..zohra Lajnef
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@ Reno Project - The Field +
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Fortadelis - Rush Hour
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Keffy Kay - To The Light
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* Stay For This Moment (medicisoundsystem Feat. Snowflake) - Ccmixter @
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Tale Of The Elegance - Anitek
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* Ben Othman - Sahara Live Remixed By "djben" @
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@ Pianochocolate - Pianochocolate_-_waltz +
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Smoked Up Contrabass - Max Loginov
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General Fuzz - Walking Home
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Reno Project - Hot Street
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St Adam - Ocean Fantasy
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Martin Eigenmann - Groovy Mood
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Dj Rostej - Dj Rostej - Long Way
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Ben Othman - Space Off
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The.madpix.project - Lonely
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C.j.rogers - Back To You
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Satya - Silk Route
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Taming Content - Transient
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A Nice World - Electric Grocery
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Zeropage - Ambient India
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Branton - Bakaland
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Highmas - The Baot Rocks (long Intro Version)
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Max Loginov - Trip!
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Basement Skylights - The Slowdown Pt1
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Single & Single - K4mmerer
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Atw - The Journey
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Nachtmusik Iii - Max Waves
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@ After All - Alexander Blu *
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Ben Othman - La Marsa Chill
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+ Zeropage - Ambient India +
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Summer Breeze - Sonic Mystery
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Blooming Chill - Serakina
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U Can Get It - Proleter
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Manuzik - Triptojazz
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K4mmerer - Style
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K4mmerer - Bender
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GrГјnemusik - Click Click (instrumental)
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Fonogeri - Midnight
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@ Ccmixter - Stay For This Moment (medicisoundsystem Feat. Snowflake) @
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Lazy Beach Breaks - K4mmerer
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@ Adult Only & Saregama - Afterzone - Saregama *
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Anitek - Apnea
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Keffy Kay - Beautiful Way
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Akoviani - Delirium
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@ General Fuzz - Go Inward +
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That Universe In My Barn - Chill Carrier
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East - Alexander Blu
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Dj Rostej - Forgotten Melody - Dj Rostej
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Sebteix - Electrojazz
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Transient - Taming Content
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Power Beat - C.j.rogers
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Offenbach Project - Paris_at_night
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C.j.rogers - Power Beat
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+ Professor Kliq - Pangea *
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Bluesanova - The Swell
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Pangea - Professor Kliq
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  • Spirit Haus Deals With Succulents and Emotional Responsibility in New Video

    adhoc.fm | Tue, 25 Sep 2018 12:00:00 -0400

    Spirit Haus is the solo project of Bruno Catrambone, whose work as guitarist for the Philly-based CRUISR has always been an essential feature of the band’s ultra-fun, party-ready sound. Setting out on his own, Catrambone released the single “You Don’t Love Me (Like You Used To)” back in July, which abandoned CRUISR’s high-concept summer jams for a slower, gauzier feel. “YDLMLYU2” is about separation and emotional fallout in blunt terms; over spacey instrumentation, he sings, “You don’t love me like you used to, lately / You don’t look me in the face no more.”
     
    Catrambone told AdHoc that the song is about “being in love with someone who is falling out of love with you; it’s knowing that this person is going to walk away and realizing that there’s nothing you can do but sit back and watch everything fall apart.” His strengths as a songwriter lie in the extent of his honesty, and in the hushed power of his articulation.
     
    The song’s music video, which we’re premiering today, chronicles the relationship between a man and a cactus. Succulents work as instant visual comedy (remember Crystal Fairy and the Magical Cactus?), and in the case of this video, as a sort of wonky golem for displaced anxieties. The first shot, of a woman dancing in a park, is intentional misdirection — no, the most intense emotional relationship here is not between two humans, but between a human and a plant. The cactus makes its debut in the following shot, where Catrambone picks it up and begins carrying it from one apartment to another. He does eventually spot the woman in the park, and even stares for a moment. But after a protracted non-interaction, he continues walking. It’s a minimal, effective bit of visual storytelling about our tendency to remain in discontent—to choose the cactus, rather than move on.
     
    “I contacted Bob Sweeney to collaborate with me on this and he immediately had a vision on how we could create something that visually evoked the same ethereal atmosphere as the music while still maintaining the turmoil experienced throughout the song,” he told Adhoc via email. “We wanted to use the plant as something being carried from place-to-place on an isolated walk the same way someone would mentally carry things they're working through in their head. The dancing scenes, performed by Caitlin Dagle, emphasize the ebb and flow of the instrumental breaks to represent the chaotic nature of trying to internally deal with something that is already fleeting.”
     
     

  • Photo Gallery: Low at National Sawdust

    adhoc.fm | Mon, 24 Sep 2018 12:00:00 -0400

    Indie rock legends and Duluth, MN natives Low graced the stage at National Sawdust last Friday night. The band celebrates their 25th anniversary this year, and the crowd had the respect and admiration to match the momentous occasion. Photographer Edwina Hay captured the magic of the evening – check it out below!

     

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  • Human People’s New Single Is All Existential Dread

    adhoc.fm | Wed, 19 Sep 2018 11:00:00 -0400

    There’s plenty of things to be anxious about.

    Human People make that clear on the latest single from their forthcoming record, Butterflies Drink Turtle Tears. “Black Flowers” starts off with an isolated drum beat that smacks of a 1960s girl group sound (think: “My Boyfriend’s Back”). Rather than hew to the sort of outdated heteronormative narrative that typified that genre, though, the Brooklyn band gives voice to internal anxiety about who is really to blame for one’s own problems. Singer Hayley Livingston oozes apathy as she asks some pretty heavy questions: “Am I lying to myself and maybe everyone else?” “What’s the point of living when you’re always alone?” “Where will you be when you’re already done with me?”

    Musically, Human People aren’t breaking any ground here. It’s a catchy enough punk ballad that clocks in at just under two minutes. But the duality between the gravity of Livingston’s words and the indifferent tone of her voice elevates the song beyond its fairly standard structure, with charmingly ironic results.

    Ultimately, “Black Flowers” doesn’t answer any of the questions it asks; they’re the kinds of questions best processed through true self-reflection, anyway. But any anxious person knows it’s easier to lean into despair and accept your capacity to ruin everything. Nobody can blame them for that—they’re only human.

    Butterflies Drink Turtle Tears drops Friday via Exploding in Sound. Human People play Baby’s Alright on November 17 with Slow Pulp.

     

  • Karen Hover Unravels Sound of Ceres’ Out-of-This-World Live Show

    adhoc.fm | Fri, 07 Sep 2018 13:00:00 -0400

    Sound of Ceres aims to mesmerize. The New York-via-Colorado synth-pop quartet brings its dreamy music to life with a unique live show, full of choreographed laser lights, reflective handmade costumes, and illusions inspired by early 1900s magicians. Founded by husband and wife Ryan and Karen Hover of Candy Claws, the Marina Abramovic-approved, outer space-bent group will perform at Alphaville for three shows this month in a residency for AdHoc. Each night will have an opener hand-picked by the band: performance artist Sarah Kinlaw on September 7, composer Dondadi (aka Connor Harwick of The Drums) on September 14, and a yet-to-be-announced “dream” artist for the final show on September 21.

     
    Ahead of the residency, Karen Hover spoke to AdHoc about their psychedelic stage productions, touring with Beach House, and recording their latest album, The Twin.
     
    You just finished a U.S. tour with Beach House, and you’re due to head back out with them to Europe soon. How was it playing with them?
     
    It was great. We went out with them in May and we just did another chunk of time in August with them and it was great—really crazy venues that are way bigger than we’ve ever played before. It was kind of a unique experience to play in pretty opera theaters and ballrooms. [Beach House is] very light-oriented like we are so it was a very fun pairing. Basically we’re both very into visuals, but their set is a little higher-end because they have the budget to do that, versus ours, which is very homespun. It was fun seeing the two side by side.
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  • Hatchie’s Dream-Pop Has All the Right Ingredients

    adhoc.fm | Tue, 04 Sep 2018 12:00:00 -0400

    On “Sugar & Spice,” the title track from Hatchie’s debut EP, the Brisbane, Australia songstress sings, “We could outlast it all.” Though the song’s lyrics revolve around an uncertain future, they could easily double as a mission statement for Hariette Pillbeam’s unique brand of pop music, which feels less tethered to modern conventions than it does to universal feelings, like longing and lust. 

    Hatchie’s songcraft relies heavily on massive, major-key hooks, with reverb-drenched vocals and jangly, shoegaze guitars giving depth to the EP’s intimate lyrics. Upon first listen, the tunes are honey-sweet, but repeat spins reveal some vinegar beneath the surface, like when Hatchie sings, “Baby, I’m a piece of glass, I shatter so fast,” on “Sleep.”

    Ahead of her Hopscotch performance on September 6 in Raleigh, NC, Pillbeam spoke with AdHoc via email about her earliest influences, the story behind the Hatchie moniker, and when fans can expect some new music. 

     

    AdHoc: When did you first starting writing music? Is there someone in your life who inspired you to pursue music as a career?

    Hatchie: I toyed around with ideas as a teenager, but didn't really write full songs until I was about 19 and started taking it more seriously. I wouldn't say there's one person who inspired me to do it; I've wanted to do it since I was a kid and always had support from family and friends. I always wanted to write my own music and play it myself, so I looked up to singers like Carole King and Jewel.

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  • U.S. Girls’ Meg Remy Has Something to Say

    adhoc.fm | Thu, 30 Aug 2018 13:00:00 -0400

    Meg Remy’s favorite topic of discussion is repression. The Canadian-American musician behind U.S. Girls has been discussing it in her music for years, whether she’s singing about patriarchy or late capitalism. Her latest album, the incredibly funky In a Poem Unlimited, takes on some heavy subject matter over the course of its 11 tracks. On “Rage of Plastics,” woman becomes infertile after years of working at a chemical plant. On “Pearly Gates,” another surrenders her body to St. Peter as a means of entering heaven.

    While that all may sound depressing, the music is the opposite. For In a Poem Unlimited, Remy enlisted musicians from the Toronto jazz collective Cosmic Range, whose horns and thumping bass bring on disco vibes as the singer croons about darkness. AdHoc caught up with Remy ahead of her Hopscotch set on September 6 to chat about crafting dance music that makes people think, the tyranny of the Roman Catholic Church, and how she stays afloat while touring.

     

    AdHoc: In a Poem Unlimited caught quite a lot of buzz this year. What does it feel like to have more people paying attention to your music?

    Meg Remy: I’m always a pretty skeptical person. Although I’ve maybe climbed another stair in terms of visibility, I’ll be curious to see how it translates this fall. The turnover rate with things is so quick right now. When I’m [playing] a sold-out show, or [I] see people singing the lyrics—[those] real life like examples feel exciting. It also feels very right. I’ve been working for 10 years on this project, and if I’ve been working for 10 years, I should be having some sold-out shows.

    Speaking of sold-out shows, you played three of those in one night for AdHoc back in April. What was that like? 

    It was fun. It was very interesting to do it how it used to be done—you know, like The Beatles or Little Richard or jazz singers would do multiple sets in a night for months on end. You learn stuff about the stage that you’re bringing to the next set. It was wild to do it once and feel how exhausting it was and to be able to recognize that people’s entire careers were made up of, you know, three sets, six days a week, for six months. 

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  • Ought’s Jam Sessions Aren’t Like Your Jam Sessions

    adhoc.fm | Mon, 27 Aug 2018 13:00:00 -0400

    The music of Montreal post-punk act Ought isn’t known for its conceptual stability. Their first two albums—2014’s More Than Any Other Day and 2015’s Sun Coming Down—had more to do with considered existential anxiety than the sort emotional volatility characterizing many of the band’s less clever contemporaries. There’s an ornate dirtiness to their music, and while words like “thorny,” “wild,” or “agitated” come to mind, none of them really do it justice. Ultimately, that refusal to be pinned down almost works as a unifying concept. 

    Their most recent album—February’s Room Inside the World, on Merge—saw Ought departing from the gritty, live quality of those early records and teaming with veteran producer Nicholas Vernhes, known for his work with Animal Collective, Deerhunter, and The War on Drugs. But rather than sink into sterility, the band reinvigorated their music with additional instrumentation—including a  70-piece choir, on “Desire”—and some of their sharpest songwriting to date.

     

    Ahead of Ought’s performance at Hopscotch on Saturday, September 8, we spoke to frontman Tim Darcy about the band’s creative process and what it means to make political music in 2018. 

     

    You've said you think about Ought’s most recent album as having more of a studio sound than the first two. How did you guys achieve that sound without compromising the live, raucous energy you’re known for?

    We still ended up doing a fair bit of things live, and I think that really helped maintain that energy. We went in feeling like we were game for anything, thinking we might go track by track and really break every element down. We did a pretty extensive demo-ing process, home-recording all the songs. In some cases, we did like three versions before we went in with Nicholas. I think it’s totally case by case. For us, working with Nicholas was a really good fit, because he was excited about the record. He got the band.

    So Nicholas was wrapped up in that process of maintaining the energy?

    Yeah, for sure. I think a different producer could’ve boxed things off more. Obviously, he knows how to make a studio record, and that was something that we wanted, having done two extremely live records. I think we found a really nice balance. Having someone who’s a little bit more like, “Oh hey, let’s try this,” or who just grabs some random thing—that type of energy is much more akin to the world of live performance. We don’t really go home and come back with riffs; we’re always jamming, and out of these long jams will come a little pocket of an idea that we then play through [in] all these different manifestations.

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  • Hopscotch Music Fest Gears Up for 2018 with a Staff Playlist

    adhoc.fm | Thu, 23 Aug 2018 17:00:00 -0400

    Hopscotch Music Festival, which we once dubbed “the premiere experimental and underground festival in America,” is about to enter its 9th year. The festival runs September 6-8 and is spread out over downtown Raleigh, NC, with a mammoth roster of headliners that includes Liz Phair, The Flaming Lips, Nile Rodgers & CHIC, Grizzly Bear, and Miguel. With Hopscotch now just a little over two weeks away, the festival’s staff was kind enough to get on a big email chain with us and share some of their favorite songs from artists on the lineup. Check out a Hopscotch Staff Playlist below, and don’t forget to grab yourself a wristband or day-pass

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  • Trevor Powers: “My best work comes from the same thoughts that are trying to destroy me."

    adhoc.fm | Fri, 17 Aug 2018 14:00:00 -0400

    A glitch is not always a fault. Sometimes, that chink in the machine can render new possibilities: a sound, a melody birthed of dysfunction. And with the right manipulation, that melody can sound gorgeous. 

    On his latest album, Mulberry Violence, Trevor Powers, formerly known as Youth Lagoon, has crafted an electric world that reprograms its defects into strengths: discordant arrangements breed balance, lyrics of loss and abuse emerge within crystalline harmonies. On album opener “XTQ Idol” robotic screams quiver and break; piano keys singe underway like overcharged currents; programmed beats ring out in metal clangs. 

    But Powers’ voice, layered and filtered like gauze, somehow bridges the cacophony. In an email interview with AdHoc, which you can read in full below, the Boise, Idaho-based instrumentalist, producer, and composer describes the album to AdHoc as a “tug of war” between “harmony and discord.” The result is a brooding, compelling embrace of our worldly condition. 

    Mulberry Violence is officially out today via Powers’ own Baby Halo label.

    Trevor Powers plays National Sawdust on Wednesday, October 17.

     

    AdHoc: In a note accompanying your recent single, “Playwright” you wrote that you ended Youth Lagoon because it “became a mental dungeon.” What gave you the impetus to break free, and what was the largest obstacle you had to face on your way out?

    Trevor Powers: It was never meant to be something that continued. It was a muted, detached world I wanted to spend a bit of time in to examine memories. But I wasn’t about to set up camp there forever; I would’ve torn my face off. I said what I wanted to say in that setting, then burned it to the ground. I didn’t want to turn it into a disgusting money grab just because the name could sell a few tickets. It became its own organism, and I was luckily in tune with it enough to kill it when it told me it wanted to die. 

    My only concern in art is following the visions. Those rapturous flashes of imagination direct every stride. If I’m following those, I know I’m going the right way. Often the flashes only last for a second or two, so it’s critical for me to always be paying attention. Ideas truly are phantoms, and life is far less grand and appealing if those phantoms aren’t chased. 

    In many scenarios, I’ve found the most colossal of obstructions come from my own fear—and there’s no way around those obstacles except to decimate them completely. The war on fear is a strange one, because it can be just as inspiring as it is devastating. Usually my best work comes from the same thoughts that are trying to destroy me. 

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  • Captured Tracks Newcomers Drahla Are All Beautiful Chaos

    adhoc.fm | Mon, 13 Aug 2018 14:00:00 -0400

    Drahla is an act to keep in your crosshairs. Newcomers to the Captured Tracks roster hailing Leeds, UK, they purvey a dark brand of inward-looking post-punk that feels evocative of the tumultuous era in which we find ourselves. 

    Today, we’re debuting the video for their seven-inch single, “Twelve Divisions of the Day,” the band’s first release on Captured Tracks. Full of erratic jump cuts and classic film flicker, the video sits somewhere between Stan Brakhage and Kenneth Anger. Over strident guitar, hammering bass, and thunderous cymbal fills, Luciel Brown apocalyptically vocalizes, “Holy water shower me,” calling for a break from our rigid schedules, our “twelve divisions of the day.” Chalk is scraped on a chalkboard, paint is brushed on a canvas, the camera looks skyward in a stairwell, and a vase is smashed. With the video’s close, we see the canvas has become the cover art of the 7-inch, as if to illustrate how chaos can turn into harmony.

    Drahla recorded "Twelve Divisions of the Day" with MJ of Hookworms at Suburban Home, and filmed the video in West Yorkshire with Daisy Georgia. “The video is an abstract representation of process and routine,” Lu told AdHoc via email. “This is depicted through the recreation of the cover artwork and repetitive nature of the content used.“ 

    "Twelve Divisions of the Day" is out now on Captured Tracks.

     

     

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